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I'm curious what, if anything, you all think that the IndieWeb as a community could do or do better to make things easier for Generation 2 users?

Additionally is there something we all (as Gen2 users) could band together to do to make it easier for others like us not to have to "suffer" as we did? Comments back to this are welcome, as is conversation in the channel, or even brainstorming on the wiki (perhaps the generations page: https://indieweb.org/generations#Generation_2_IndieWeb)

 

Sorry to hear that it took so much work, but the end result is pretty cool. I hope it has a useful advertising effect and would be curious to hear the numbers if you track them.

 

Here's roughly the reason that the "Like" button is being pushed into your syndicated copies: https://github.com/Automattic/jetpack/issues/4399

Ultimately, I decided that very few people were using that like functionality on my site (which is WordPress specific), so I just turned it off in JetPack to "fix" the problem. There are other possible methods to fix it within your theme, but it will ultimately be very hacky based on my past attempts.

 

John, it was worth writing this just for your response.

 

@cdevroe @johnjohnston Ideally, it would be best if people were using their own blogs for direct replies. Then *if* they choose to syndicate those responses to micro.blog, it would be best if micro.blog were able to parse that reply and see the in-reply-to mf2 class to be able to properly find and thread the conversation on micro.blog.

I tend to treat micro.blog as a feed reader of sorts, but for those who have their own blogs with webmentions (the case with this post right here), I'll definitely reply to their blog directly, though this can tend to dampen the conversation for those taking part on micro.blog, but this is the case for the disjointed conversations happening on Facebook, Twitter, etc. Sometimes it's not always easy to keep the conversation on one's own site while simultaneously playing nicely with silos.

While micro.blog is a great product that supports some interesting pieces, for those with their own sites and webmentions, it's still just another silo. The secret is to treat it the same way one would with Twitter, Facebook, or any other site you'd syndicate out to. Because micro.blog is a hybrid site sitting between the old world and the new, how you use it and interact will have to change based on whether you're using it for hosting or not and whether you support niceties like Webmentions or not.

For me It's always been easier to post the start of the thread and then go to micro.blog (or Twitter or Facebook) to continue a discussion with others knowing that I'll get the webmentions back to my site where I'll still manage to own the content. The tougher piece is for others (who also own their sites) to inject their reply via their own site into the original person's blog as well as the siloed conversation at the same time.

 

@cleverdevil Reminds me of our gardener who went on vacation a month before we put the house up for sale, and didn't manage to come back. Had to rush to get a few gardeners to do a massive clean up and clear back our jungle at the last minute.

 

@vboykis Wait? A *second* blog I didn't seem to know about?! Are there others I'm missing?

 

@keithjgrant @SaraSoueidan @snookca @danmall @adactio There are some micropub clients that will do this on mobile http://indieweb.org/Micropub/Clients#Micropublish

 

@cleverdevil It's official if you say it is. :) Ought to document it for the history books at least.

 

@cleverdevil @DreamHost Awesome! Did you get a photo? (or document it at https://indieweb.org/events/2017-08-09-homebrew-website-club?)

 

@schmarty The POSSEd tweet is beautiful and awesome. What's the secret??! @jimpick @realkimhansen special sauce perhaps?

 

@kongaloosh Happy to help via any means, though IW chat channel may be easiest.

 

@BryanAlexander I'm not just holding my breath waiting for a response--sometimes I turn blue and fall off my chair. ;)

 

But just like Facebook has a HUGE cadre of geeky engineers who've been working for more than 10 years to make it work easily enough for your parents to use, we're the (currently small) group of geeky IndieWeb users who will eventually make it easy enough for everyone else too. ;)

I'd be willing to bet that far fewer of us in comparison can have a more dramatic effect on the web than Facebook has, even if it takes a somewhat longer timeline (and that mostly because we're all doing it on a hobby-ist basis and not full time).

 

@Angeli_Richard Endwearring