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Biomedical and Electrical Engineer with interests in information theory, evolution, genetics, abstract mathematics, microbiology, big history, Indieweb, and the entertainment industry including: finance, distribution, representation

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IndieWebifying my website: part 1, the why & how | AltPlatform

AltPlatform blogger Richard MacManus details how he's modifying his website to join the independent web. I'm tickled pink that he holds my site up as a quintessential example. (I'm hoping he's using it in the sense of the Latin word for five as I can name at least that many and even more that are better...) Of course, like Bernard of Chartres, I've only been able to see further because of giants like Matthias Pfefferle, David Shanske, dozens of other indieweb proponents, and the thousands upon thousands of folks in the WordPress community.

 

Sending likes and replies using custom fields in WordPress

A short description of how to support Indieweb likes and replies in WordPress using custom fields.

Another simple option for those who like bookmarklets: IndieWeb Press This

 

Losing My Patience with Google+ #indieweb

And this is where I start to get really mad. Like many others here, I have invested a lot of personal time and energy building a following here. Like many of you, I have poured heart and soul into filling this place not just with great content, but also with a sense of community. I could have made those investments in Twitter or Facebook or reddit, but like many of you, I made them here. And now I'm starting to wonder how smart of a decision that was.

We've heard these cries before all too many times, and sadly we're likely to continue to hear them into the future until and unless people begin taking the web into their own hands.

 
 

Getting started with schema.org using Microdata

Most webmasters are familiar with HTML tags on their pages. Usually, HTML tags tell the browser how to display the information included in the tag. For example,

Avatar

tells the browser to display the text string "Avatar" in a heading 1 format. However, the HTML tag doesn't give any information about what that text string means—"Avatar" could refer to the hugely successful 3D movie, or it could refer to a type of profile picture—and this can make it more difficult for search engines to intelligently display relevant content to a user.
Schema.org provides a collection of shared vocabularies webmasters can use to mark up their pages in ways that can be understood by the major search engines: Google, Microsoft, Yandex and Yahoo!
You use the schema.org vocabulary along with the Microdata, RDFa, or JSON-LD formats to add information to your Web content. This guide will help get you up to speed with Microdata and schema.org so that you can start adding markup to your web pages.
Although this guide focusses on Microdata, most examples on the schema.org site show examples in RDFa and JSON-LD too. The basic ideas (types, properties etc.) introduced here are relevant beyond Microdata - take a look at the examples to see how the details compare.