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Biomedical and Electrical Engineer with interests in information theory, evolution, genetics, abstract mathematics, microbiology, big history, Indieweb, and the entertainment industry including: finance, distribution, representation

boffosocko.com

chrisaldrich

chrisaldrich

+13107510548

chris@boffosocko.com

u/0/+ChrisAldrich1

stream.boffosocko.com

www.boffosockobooks.com

chrisaldrich

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The acquisition of GitHub reminds me about how versatile it can be for a variety of use cases. I hope Microsoft continues iterating on it to expand its usability to reach an even larger audience.

https://boffosocko.com/2014/09/17/revision-control

 

Duplication of links upon update · Issue #45 · dshanske/syndication-links https://github.com/dshanske/syndication-links/issues/45

With v3.1.1 and relying on SNAP for POSSE, I'm noticing that after publishing and syndicating, if one comes back and edits a post and then updates it, Syndication Links regrabs the URL's and duplicates the links.

The first unedited version that is shown seems to be a plain http link and after editing/updating, the second duplicated link that is added automatically is an https version.

Manually deleting either of the included links from the Syndication Links box doesn't get rid of the links.

This duplication of the links only happens on posts which have been later edited/updated.

example: http://boffosocko.com/2017/02/16/podcast-directories-why-cant-we/
Here the Twitter and Facebook links, which are generated from SNAP, are duplicated, first as http and then again as https. As a test, the two other syndication links are non-SNAP generated links: huffduffer was manually inserted, and the WordPress one was generated from the WordPress Cross Post plugin, so I'm guessing it's an issue caused by the storage of SNAP links (which are https) versus Syndications Links' storage.

 

I love @Nuzzel!
@abrams, The new newsletter functionality is pretty cool, however, I tried spelunking to get rid of daily email notifications for a newsletter I don't care about/send out and ended up turning on a daily email notification for another(!) newsletter I don't care about. Can you add a toggle for these email notifications in the settings page before these emails ruin what is otherwise a near-perfect news aggregation tool?

Other thoughts:
Given the newsletter functionality, it wouldn't take too much more UI to turn this into a broader functioning link blog. Could I have a bookmarklet to add articles to my newsletter? Could I embed my daily links/newsletter into my blog to improve pre-existing reach? How about alternate timeframes for publishing a newsletter (daily/weekly/monthly)?

 
 
 

Had a lovely conference call with Kindle Direct Publishing's White Glove Program @AmazonKDP. Can't wait to hear more!

 

At the most basic level [book:Getting What You Came For: The Smart Student's Guide to Earning an M.A. or a Ph.D.|460669] has some relatively sound advice. If you need something entertaining my friend Adam Ruben's book [book:Surviving Your Stupid, Stupid Decision to Go to Grad School|7769479] is pretty good.

For some of the other topics you mention, start reading The Chronicle of Higher Education. Most of it is available online without a subscription, but they've got lots of current faculty writing regularly on the topics you mentioned.

Slowly you'll find a community of online professors like Robert Talbert (http://chronicle.com/blognetwork/castingoutnines/) or blogs like http://mathwithbaddrawings.com/ that can be very helpful. Then there's even folks like https://terrytao.wordpress.com/ as well.

On twitter, you might consider following some the people on this list to start: https://twitter.com/ChrisAldrich/lists/mathematicians/members
Within twitter, there are a handful of hashtags you might following/comment along with including: , , and likely a handful of others.

On the practical side, consider creating accounts on mendeley.com, academica.com, researchgate.com, etc. as a way to find people, help, material, etc. You might also consider starting yourself a blog (aka Commonplace book) to collect all your thoughts: http://stream.withknown.com/2015/why-you-should-start-a-website-as-a-college-student (Keep in mind that some platforms like WordPress allow you to keep things as "drafts" without publishing them, so they're then available everywhere you might need them.)

Finally, for graduate level math, I highly recommend spending the $100-200 for a Livescribe Pulse pen: http://www.livescribe.com.

Feel free to ping me here or via other means (http://boffosocko.com) for help/questions.