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The IndieWeb Movement and Drupal

A BoF session about IndieWeb at DrupalCampLA

Location: Drupal Camp Los Angeles, UC Irvine Campus, Student Center, Irvine, CA

Time:

Ends:

See also: http://2015.drupalcampla.com/sessions/indieweb-movement-and-drupal
Specific time of the session will be determined and set on/around week of 8/23/15.

The IndieWeb is a growing people-focused alternative to the ‘corporate web’.

This BoF session is encouraged for all levels of Drupal users: beginner, intermediate, and advanced. Developers, and particularly those working for larger corporations, should be interested in the benefits that some of the IndieWeb principles can convey to the marketing/communications departments of their clients' companies.

Haven't you (or your clients) always wanted to be the "hub" of your own online presence with ancillary social services helping to serve your purposes rather than the services' own interests? Isn't this why we all want to build and have our own online spaces in the first place?

With the rise of areas like social media, it's often the case that much of our content and material lives in corporate silos like Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, Pinterest, and a variety of other sites. Sadly, as netizens, we do not have direct control over these sites, often can't export our data from them, and they can be (and often are) bought out or shut down at almost a moments notice. Worse, comments and interaction with our content is typically also stuck in these silos and it lives or dies with them. Wouldn't you love to have the network effect and value that these sites bring without the extra work or hindrances they bring?

There is a growing and very viable alternative to this model which is being built by the IndieWebCamp community as a multi-platform and opensource project which dovetails well with the ideals of the Drupal community.

Those who are interested in learning about and discussing some of the basic principles and philosophies of the movement are encouraged to attend. We'll chat about some of the current projects and capabilities as well as open standards that help enable the functionality you've always wanted (or maybe didn't know you wanted until now) in your websites.

Moving forward, we can all build IndieWeb principles into the Drupal platform to help it remain relevant as the web continues to grow and evolve.

A wealth of information about the IndieWeb community can be found at their website, but as a brief overview some of their basic principles appear below:

Your content is yours
When you post something on the web, it should belong to you, not a corporation. Too many companies have gone out of business and lost all of their users’ data. By joining the IndieWeb, your content stays yours and in your control.

You are better connected
Your articles and status messages can go to all services, not just one, allowing you to engage with everyone. Even replies and likes on other services can come back to your site so they’re all in one place.

You are in control
You can post anything you want, in any format you want, with no one monitoring you. In addition, you share simple readable links such as example.com/ideas. These links are permanent and will always work.

Category: BoF
Skill: Beginner, Intermediate, Advanced
Duration: One hour
Session Tags: , , , ,

 

The IndieWeb Movement and Drupal

3 min read

The IndieWeb is a growing people-focused alternative to the ‘corporate web’.

This BoF session is encouraged for all levels of Drupal users: beginner, intermediate, and advanced. Developers, and particularly those working for larger corporations, should be interested in the benefits that some of the IndieWeb principles can convey to the marketing/communications departments of their clients' companies.

Haven't you (or your clients) always wanted to be the "hub" of your own online presence with ancillary social services helping to serve your purposes rather than the services' own interests? Isn't this why we all want to build and have our own online spaces in the first place?

With the rise of areas like social media, it's often the case that much of our content and material lives in corporate silos like Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, Pinterest, and a variety of other sites. Sadly, as netizens, we do not have direct control over these sites, often can't export our data from them, and they can be (and often are) bought out or shut down at almost a moments notice. Worse, comments and interaction with our content is typically also stuck in these silos and it lives or dies with them. Wouldn't you love to have the network effect and value that these sites bring without the extra work or hindrances they bring?

There is a growing and very viable alternative to this model which is being built by the IndieWebCamp community as a multi-platform and opensource project which dovetails well with the ideals of the Drupal community.

Those who are interested in learning about and discussing some of the basic principles and philosophies of the movement are encouraged to attend. We'll chat about some of the current projects and capabilities as well as open standards that help enable the functionality you've always wanted (or maybe didn't know you wanted until now) in your websites.

Moving forward, we can all build IndieWeb principles into the Drupal platform to help it remain relevant as the web continues to grow and evolve.

A wealth of information about the IndieWeb community can be found at their website, but as a brief overview some of their basic principles appear below:

Your content is yours

When you post something on the web, it should belong to you, not a corporation. Too many companies have gone out of business and lost all of their users’ data. By joining the IndieWeb, your content stays yours and in your control.

You are better connected

Your articles and status messages can go to all services, not just one, allowing you to engage with everyone. Even replies and likes on other services can come back to your site so they’re all in one place.

You are in control

You can post anything you want, in any format you want, with no one monitoring you. In addition, you share simple readable links such as example.com/ideas. These links are permanent and will always work.

Category: BoF

Skill: Beginner

Duration: One hour

Session Tags: IndieWeb, social media, Open Source, web architecture, open standards

Register for the session at 2015 Drupal Camp LA at http://2015.drupalcampla.com/sessions/indieweb-movement-and-drupal

 

I'm hosting a BoF session for for Drupal at the upcoming @ladrupal http://2015.drupalcampla.com/sessions/indieweb-movement-and-drupal

 

Drupal & ? @KevinMarks I'm making plans for @LADrupal in 2 weeks & was considering a session to introduce people to the movement.

I've dabbled in for a while via WordPress and @WithKnown, but I'm curious if anyone can give me some advice/help/pointers with logistics from the IndieWebCamp side? It's been a while since there was something in the LA area (http://indiewebcamp.com/2013/Hollywood), but it would be nice to have the relatively large developer community here more engaged on a regular basis. Perhaps this meeting of about 500 at the UC Irvine campus can help to spill over into regular meetings in the Los Angeles and Southern California areas?

Is there anyone in the area who's available August 29th (preferably) or 30th that would like to join me in doing this?

 

My @Quora answer to Is there a quick way to republish Twitter updates onto a blog? http://www.quora.com/Is-there-a-quick-way-to-republish-Twitter-updates-onto-a-blog/answer/Chris-Aldrich?srid=qkX

There are a small variety of answers here some of which (including Ashton Kutcher's suggestion of the formerly awesome ping.fm) are already defunct in less than a year or two, which indicates the fickle and rapidly changing nature of the internet.

I'll start by not accepting the premise of the question, but modifying the conceptualization to something more interesting and robust. Since there are hundreds upon hundreds of defunct web services many of which have died with little to no advance warning and which more often than not were information silos that didn't allow their users to export their data (see: site-deaths - IndieWebCamp [http://indiewebcamp.com/site_deaths]), I would highly recommend asking the following question instead:
"Is there a quick way to cross-publish or syndicate my content to Twitter?"

The hidden sentiment of the original question: "how can I easily keep my own data in the eventuality that Twitter disappears?" is really the root of the problem and is one which the IndieWeb movement has been diligently working on for several years. I'll let them speak for themselves:

Your content is yours
When you post something on the web, it should belong to you, not a corporation. Too many companies have gone out of business and lost all of their users’ data. By joining the IndieWeb, your content stays yours and in your control.

You are better connected
Your articles and status messages can go to all services, not just one, allowing you to engage with everyone. Even replies and likes on other services can come back to your sites o they’re all in one place.

You are in control
You can post anything you want, in any format you want, with no one monitoring you. In addition, you share simple readable links such as Page on example.com. These links arepermanent and will always work.
-- Source: IndieWebCamp [http://indiewebcamp.com/]

The general philosophy is that it is easy enough to own your own site, own your own data, and then syndicate it out to any of the variety of content silos that exist (while sucking additionally created follow-on data, such as comments, likes, etc. back into your own site), so that you can simultaneously take advantage of the network effects of these silos while still owning everything and not chancing that it will disappear without warning. I'd highly recommend surfing around the IndieWebCamp site for a bit, but I imagine that most will find it actually describes the way many wished the internet worked.

Now that we've got the background philosophy of the question sorted out, let's take a look at the semantics of the solution. The question is essentially asking about the IndieWeb concept of Publish (on your) Own Site, Syndicate Elsewhere (aka POSSE [http://indiewebcamp.com/POSSE]). The mechanics are somewhat different depending on the home platform on which one builds one's site, but almost all platforms allow one to at least post the "headline" of their post along with a permalink manually. IndieWeb forward platforms like Wordpress, Tumblr, Drupal, and WithKnown either have the functionality to cross-post to twitter automatically or do so fairly easily with simple and free plugins (e.g.: WordPress's ubiquitous plugin has a "publicize" functionality that allows crossposting to major silos like Facebook, Twitter, Google+, Tumblr, and LinkedIn among others). Most of these also have either built in or plugin functionality to pull comments, likes, and reshares from the specific silo back to the original content, so that all of it is memorialized in the same place. For those that need it, the POSSE page at IndieWebCamp (linked above) has a variety of ideas and resources for a variety of platforms.

 

Upgrading @WithKnown on One's Own Server

3 min read

It's only been a short time since I installed my own copy of WithKnown (GitHub) and there have been a few small upgrades since that time, but I was overdue for upgrading. I'd also seen one or two errors when posting, and figured that the small bugs I was seeing would have been worked out.

When I went to upgrade earlier in the week, I figured I'd wing it since at the time there weren't any instructions for upgrading in the documentation (or at least that I'd noticed at the time.)  Somehow I got sidetracked and finally just came back to it today.  Following the general procedure for upgrading projects like Drupal and WordPress, I trundled along and found generally reasonable results until I realized that URLs weren't mapping quite properly, photos were missing, and something was a bit "off". (I had tried reinstalling my original config.ini file along with the Uploads file, but that didn't seem to work somehow.)

I went back to check the documentation, and lo-and-behold, in the intervening week,  there are now some scant upgrade instructions available which follow below: 

Upgrading Known is designed to be very simple.

  • Take a backup of your Known directory and database.
  • Overwrite your Known files except your upload directory.
  • Access your Known site homepage.

I was reticent upon visiting my homepage as I received a splash screen exactly like the original set up, and was very worried that I might manage to blow out some of the primary data and crash the whole thing. (I did remember to do a back up before starting, but who wants to deal with that if they don't have to.)

I decided to plunge ahead and proceeded like I was setting things up for the first time. I was directed to a page to enter in the database name, login, password, etc., which creates a config.ini file in the root, and was then redirected to my site, with all the links and data perfectly intact and functioning properly. 

For those who haven't done it themselves, and have the same reticence I did, I'd recommend adding a few additional steps to the process:

4. Click on the set up button

5. Enter in your database name, user name, host name and password

6. Update the path for the "Uploads" folder. (It may automatically default to the proper path name, but double check it.)

7. Hit enter and you'll be taken to your site.

Depending on what one is using for the update, I might also recommend blowing out (deleting) the original Known files in your root directory in step 2, and installing the new ones rather than simple overwriting so one isn't left with out of date files.