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Biomedical and Electrical Engineer with interests in information theory, evolution, genetics, abstract mathematics, microbiology, big history, Indieweb, and the entertainment industry including: finance, distribution, representation

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chrisaldrich

chrisaldrich

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micro.blog/c

 

For those interested in more and who know a bit of code, David's also got a "master class" on adding microformats to modern themes in his commit trail for updating/upgrading the TwentySixteen theme to be more IndieWeb friendly: https://github.com/dshanske/twentysixteen-indieweb/commits/master

While it isn't comprehensive and may not cover every eventuality for every theme, following along with his commits here will get you a long way towards better understanding microformats v2 use with WordPress. I think I've learned more about WordPress themes and microformats by following his changes here than anything else I've tried.

 

Today's afternoon sessions for IndieWebCamp Baltimore are posted! Links for video feeds coming
Sessions include
https://indieweb.org/2018/Baltimore/Sessions

 

@mrkrndvs I'm curious if you manually cut & paste your replies for others' sites (who may not support webmention or even pingback/trackback) into their old-school comments sections?

I often worry that without that, or without replying to versions on Twitter if they syndicated, they won't see my response via pingback/trackback or other means. Instead my reply sits all alone on my site and they don't have the benefit of seeing it at all unless they come across it organically otherwise.

Generally when I manually cut and paste replies, I'll often use the comment's "website" field to include the permalink for my comment and then I'll take the permalink for my comment and add it to my syndication links since I've manually syndicated it.

Sometimes I notice that including multiple links in a reply can also run afoul of spam filters.

One of my favorite set of machinations occurred recently when I wrote this reply to Jon Udell: http://boffosocko.com/2018/01/07/reply-to-annotating-web-audio-by-jon-udell/

Jon came back to his original post and appended his own comment to document my comment in the most circuitous of manners which included using his annotation tool Hypothes.is: https://blog.jonudell.net/2018/01/06/annotating-web-audio/#comment-474656

Interestingly we both used WordPress, Hypothes.is, and Twitter to carry on the conversation. I was quite impressed that he took the time to circle back around and document my end of the conversation since he must have missed my pingback (he doesn't have webmentions) and my manual cut & paste, but did manage to see the notification on Twitter.

It all just goes to show that you've got to keep your eye on the tech that you and everyone else is using until it's broadly and evenly distributed. One day perhaps...

 

Replied to a post on github.com :

 

Only a noob question because you asked it via a Known site! ;)

But it is a good one. Child themes only really need two files: the style.css and a functions.php. In the style.css file there's a block of text at the top with details about the theme. One of the lines has the name "Template" and its value is the case-sensitive name of the parent theme's folder in your /wp-content/themes folder. Thus to have your child theme pointing at the correct parent, you'll want to modify this "Template" line appropriately.

FYI: If it helps, Smashing Magazine has a pretty thorough article on WordPress Child Themes and what they're doing and how: https://www.smashingmagazine.com/2016/01/create-customize-wordpress-child-theme/

 

YouTube URL embeds not working · Issue #1 · dshanske/twentysixteen-indieweb https://github.com/dshanske/twentysixteen-indieweb/issues/1

In archive views (/kind/post_kind/) and individual pages, typical raw YouTube URLs in pages that previously converted them into embeds via WordPress now just display them as text (non-clickable) URLs.

This may also extend to other types of WordPress embeds as well.

 

If you're curious how I've managed to do natural to WordPress threaded commenting, then join us for the virtual Homebrew Website Club this afternoon for more details:
http://boffosocko.com/2017/11/30/virtual-homebrew-website-club-meetup-on-december-13-2017/

 

I'd been looking for something like this for a long time too.

For the past couple of months, I've been using an IFTTT recipe that takes anything I watch on YouTube, which I designate essentially with their thumbs up, and it creates a draft post on my site.
https://ifttt.com/applets/46019464d-if-new-liked-video-then-create-a-post-on-your-wordpress-blog

Some things I keep privately while others get posted publicly. You could write most of the format of your "like" within the IFTTT interface, including the u-like-of.

For a while I've been using the Post Kinds Plugin to parse the URL and pull in the meta-data as well as wrapping it with the u-like-of. Despite being more of a PESOS workflow, it's pretty quick and simple. Here's a recent "watch" post: http://boffosocko.com/2017/11/06/dont-worry-be-happy-by-bobby-mcferrin/ Though you could easily change the "Watch" metadata to a "Like" without a lot of work.

Post Kinds Plugin is theme-able so you can modify things to display the way you'd like, though I generally find the default is pretty solid.

Alternately, Post Kinds also allows you to create a bookmarklet that imports the URL directly to quickly create a post (of almost any type). I've detailed how to do it here: https://boffosocko.com/2017/08/11/post-kinds-plugin-for-wordpress/#Bookmarklet+Configuration

 

@andrea It looks like you're missing the Semantic Linkbacks plugin for WordPress. That should make your facepiles have actual faces and display much better. https://github.com/pfefferle/wordpress-semantic-linkbacks

How are you posting to Known? Using Quill or another micropub application? Do you have the WithKnown Twitter plugin installed? https://github.com/idno/Twitter That can help some of the display issues you're probably seeing.

I'm sure many in the IndieWeb chat (Slack, IRC, Web, etc.) can give you help if you need it. There's a main room, and and specific channels. https://indieweb.org/discuss

I'm out at the moment but am happy to help more later if you need it.

 

@jackysee Typically I use a WordPress plugin called Social Network Auto Poster, but the bridgy plugin is pretty solid as well.

 

@Chronotope I think that @palewire built this into WordPress at some point: http://wordpress-memento-plugin.readthedocs.io/en/latest/

 

Makes me wish I was in Auckland at the end of the month to chat with @billbennettnz on @WordPress and
https://twitter.com/billbennettnz/status/929939875058429952

 

@frank Webmentions are an extra generation or two beyond the traditional pingbacks/trackbacks. The receiver actually verifies that the sender is displaying the permalink on a physical page before accepting it, thereby cutting down on spam (there have been no reports of webmention spam in the wild yet.) Webmentions and their structure are also set up to allow the receiving site to better handle display which often includes the name, avatar, and either excerpts, or complete comment. I use them in WordPress and there's generally little if any difference in the display of Webmention replies and comments natively put into the system manually. Webmention also allows additonal types of mentions including likes, bookmarks, reads, listens, etc. to distinguish for context.

 

Though WP deprecated the Links Manager, it's still in core, and as we all know, they're BIG (maybe too big) on backwards compatibility. I suspect that if they did remove it altogether, they would abstract it out to a standalone plugin.

There are also newer updated plugins like https://wordpress.org/plugins/simple-links/ for those who are more concerned.

Either way, I'm hoping that this sort of functionality "comes back to life" on the open web, so perhaps WP will not only bring it back, but put more resources into extending it.

 

@jackjamieson I just saw your profile pop up on the IW wiki and was excited to see someone else interested in WordPress related readers. There are a few others in the repository that you might want to be aware of including:
* Orbital Feed Reader: https://wordpress.org/plugins/orbital-feed-reader/
* PressForward: https://wordpress.org/plugins/pressforward/
* Edublogs: https://edublogs.org/ (They've got a built in (non-optional) feed reader plugin, but I believe it's proprietary to their platform.)

Though PressForward was built for a tangential use, I think it may be one of the most robust and fully featured in the group. I know it's actively developed and would likely accept pull requests. I've written a bit about using it before here:
http://boffosocko.com/2016/12/31/pressforward-as-an-indieweb-wordpress-based-rss-feed-reader-pocketinstapaper-replacement/

I'm curious what your particular itches are in the area, especially if they include adding Woodwind-type interactions to a WordPress based indie reader? This may be one of the biggest pieces missing from the WordPress indie ecosystem.