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Biomedical and Electrical Engineer with interests in information theory, evolution, genetics, abstract mathematics, microbiology, big history, IndieWeb, mnemonics, and the entertainment industry including: finance, distribution, representation

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chrisaldrich

chrisaldrich

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A refback (remember those?!) today reminded me about this post: Non-technical IndieWeb: Fun, Creativity, Community, and “Content” https://boffosocko.com/2020/12/20/non-technical-indieweb-fun-creativity-community-and-content/
I should try to add more on and to my IndieWeb Collection https://boffosocko.com/research/indieweb/

 

Restaurant Review: A revamped upscale burger joint in Glendale, CA

4 out of 5 stars

Eden on Brand, right next to the Alex Theater, has taken a dramatic step up from its prior location further North (which is now closed, by the way).

The atmosphere is stunning and very chic and borders on Hollywood night club with staff dressed to match, and apparently two more floors set to open soon according to employees. The darker theme with wood, stone, metal, and leather highlighted brilliantly with subtle lighting was fantastic. The restaurant is large and spacious and I can only imagine how fantastic the kitchen must be to work in. The space was actually so large, I almost wondered why they didn't try to sneak in a few more 2 tops on the first floor to give things a bit more bustle amid the hip music vibe being piped in.

The food, while a tad on the high side for standard burger fare, is generally great and exceptionally tasty. I loved the Royal Blue burger which had just enough blue cheese to be spectacular without going overboard. Similarly their signature Black Label Burger was fantastically beefy and even juicier than the Royal Blue. Both burgers were cooked perfectly. Given their burger creativity, I'm surprised that they didn't have a Kobe beef burger on the menu.

The shoestring fries, while cooked wonderfully and garnished with just the right amount of parsley were lacking a bit in flavor and could have used some more salt.  Perhaps frying them in flavored oil or adding a light sprinkling of garlic could have lifted them to the level of the rest of the fare and the surrounding ambiance? The spicy ketchup was a nice attempt, but was far too overpowering given the flatter fries and didn't fit in with the flavor profile of the burgers. Larger ketchup vessels might make it easier to dip a burger if desired.

The appetizers were passable, but not nearly as creative as the burger options. I tried their carrot appetizer which sadly, while interesting, didn't put the carrots front and center and left them a bit overcooked.  The chefs might consider updating the appetizer menu with some more creativity or possibly swiping a few ideas from the Smith Brothers in Pasadena or Crossings in South Pasadena as this seems to be what they're chasing after, but still keep things in the mold of the high-end burger joint.

Their beer selections were nice as was the list of harder alcohols, but I'm surprised they didn't have a signature drink menu which could go a long way towards highlighting their bar for increased revenue.

The staff, while warm and welcoming still needs to up their game a tad, though hopefully this will come with time as they settle into the new space which is only about a month old.  Refinements could include: tipping customers off to the fact that the ketchup is spiced; not being so clumsy as to ask diners if they want to keep their silverware, but just bringing out new sets automatically with changes in courses (especially given the higher bar of dining that's being portrayed); pronouncing duck confit properly (it's French); and possibly suggesting beer pairings with particular burgers (if they're not going to be suggested on the menu). Check averages would also be a higher if they checked on refills or alternates during the meal as well.

I can certainly see where they're going with the ambiance and the food, and would certainly come back again. It would be a complete five star experience if they can up their game just a tad to have everything match their fine location and decor.

Also posted on Yelp

 

Restaurant Review: A revamped upscale burger joint in Glendale, CA

Eden on Brand, right next to the Alex Theater, has taken a dramatic step up from its prior location further North (which is now closed, by the way).

The atmosphere is stunning and very chic and borders on Hollywood night club with staff dressed to match, and apparently two more floors set to open soon according to employees. The darker theme with wood, stone, metal, and leather highlighted brilliantly with subtle lighting was fantastic. The restaurant is large and spacious and I can only imagine how fantastic the kitchen must be to work in. The space was actually so large, I almost wondered why they didn't try to sneak in a few more 2 tops on the first floor to give things a bit more bustle amid the hip music vibe being piped in.

The food, while a tad on the high side for standard burger fare, is generally great and exceptionally tasty. I loved the Royal Blue burger which had just enough blue cheese to be spectacular without going overboard. Similarly their signature Black Label Burger was fantastically beefy and even juicier than the Royal Blue. Both burgers were cooked perfectly. Given their burger creativity, I'm surprised that they didn't have a Kobe beef burger on the menu.

The Royal Blue Burger

The shoestring fries, while cooked wonderfully and garnished with just the right amount of parsley were lacking a bit in flavor and could have used some more salt.  Perhaps frying them in flavored oil or adding a light sprinkling of garlic could have lifted them to the level of the rest of the fare and the surrounding ambiance? The spicy ketchup was a nice attempt, but was far too overpowering given the flatter fries and didn't fit in with the flavor profile of the burgers. Larger ketchup vessels might make it easier to dip a burger if desired.

The appetizers were passable, but not nearly as creative as the burger options. I tried their carrot appetizer which sadly, while interesting, didn't put the carrots front and center and left them a bit overcooked.  The chefs might consider updating the appetizer menu with some more creativity or possibly swiping a few ideas from the Smith Brothers in Pasadena or Crossings in South Pasadena as this seems to be what they're chasing after, but still keep things in the mold of the high-end burger joint.

Their beer selections were nice as was the list of harder alcohols, but I'm surprised they didn't have a signature drink menu which could go a long way towards highlighting their bar for increased revenue.

The staff, while warm and welcoming still needs to up their game a tad, though hopefully this will come with time as they settle into the new space which is only about a month old.  Refinements could include: tipping customers off to the fact that the ketchup is spiced; not being so clumsy as to ask diners if they want to keep their silverware, but just bringing out new sets automatically with changes in courses (especially given the higher bar of dining that's being portrayed); pronouncing duck confit properly (it's French); and possibly suggesting beer pairings with particular burgers (if they're not going to be suggested on the menu). Check averages would also be a higher if they checked on refills or alternates during the meal as well.

I can certainly see where they're going with the ambiance and the food, and would certainly come back again. It would be a complete five star experience if they can up their game just a tad to have everything match their fine location and decor.

Also posted on Yelp

 

Review of Eden on Brand | An upscale burger joint in Glendale, CA

4 min read

Eden on Brand, right next to the Alex Theater, has taken a dramatic step up from its prior location further North (which is now closed, by the way).

The atmosphere is stunning and very chic and borders on Hollywood night club with staff dressed to match, and apparently two more floors set to open soon according to employees. The darker theme with wood, stone, metal, and leather highlighted brilliantly with subtle lighting was fantastic. The restaurant is large and spacious and I can only imagine how fantastic the kitchen must be to work in. The space was actually so large, I almost wondered why they didn't try to sneak in a few more 2 tops on the first floor to give things a bit more bustle amid the hip music vibe being piped in.

The food, while a tad on the high side for standard burger fare, is generally great and exceptionally tasty. I loved the Royal Blue burger which had just enough blue cheese to be spectacular without going overboard. Similarly their signature Black Label Burger was fantastically beefy and even juicier than the Royal Blue. Both burgers were cooked perfectly. Given their burger creativity, I'm surprised that they didn't have a Kobe beef burger on the menu.

The Royal Blue Burger

The shoestring fries, while cooked wonderfully and garnished with just the right amount of parsley were lacking a bit in flavor and could have used some more salt.  Perhaps frying them in flavored oil or adding a light sprinkling of garlic could have lifted them to the level of the rest of the fare and the surrounding ambiance? The spicy ketchup was a nice attempt, but was far too overpowering given the flatter fries and didn't fit in with the flavor profile of the burgers. Larger ketchup vessels might make it easier to dip a burger if desired.

The appetizers were passable, but not nearly as creative as the burger options. I tried their carrot appetizer which sadly, while interesting, didn't put the carrots front and center and left them a bit overcooked.  The chefs might consider updating the appetizer menu with some more creativity or possibly swiping a few ideas from the Smith Brothers in Pasadena or Crossings in South Pasadena as this seems to be what they're chasing after, but still keep things in the mold of the high-end burger joint.

Their beer selections were nice as was the list of harder alcohols, but I'm surprised they didn't have a signature drink menu which could go a long way towards highlighting their bar for increased revenue.

The staff, while warm and welcoming still needs to up their game a tad, though hopefully this will come with time as they settle into the new space which is only about a month old.  Refinements could include: tipping customers off to the fact that the ketchup is spiced; not being so clumsy as to ask diners if they want to keep their silverware, but just bringing out new sets automatically with changes in courses (especially given the higher bar of dining that's being portrayed); pronouncing duck confit properly (it's French); and possibly suggesting beer pairings with particular burgers (if they're not going to be suggested on the menu). Check averages would also be a higher if they checked on refills or alternates during the meal as well.

I can certainly see where they're going with the ambiance and the food, and would certainly come back again. It would be a complete five star experience if they can up their game just a tad to have everything match their fine location and decor.

Also posted on Yelp

 

This is a brilliant exercise!

I have to imagine that once the conceptualization of language and some basic grammar existed word generation was a much more common thing than it is now. It's only been since the time of Noah Webster that humans have been actively standardizing things like spelling. If we can use Papua New Guinea as a model of pre-agrarian society and consider that almost 12% of extant languages on the Earth are spoken in an area about the size of Texas (and with about 1/5th the population of Texas too), then modern societies are actually severely limiting language (creation, growth, diversity, creativity, etc.) [cross reference: http://www.scmp.com/infographics/article/1810040/infographic-world-languages]

Consider that the current extinction of languages is about one every 14 weeks, which puts us on a course to loose about half of the 7,100 languages on the planet right now before the end of the century. Collective learning has potentially been growing at the expense of a shrinking body of diverse language.

To help put this exercise into perspective, we can look at the corpus of extant written Latin (a technically dead language): It is a truly impressive fact that, simply by knowing that if one can memorize and master about 250 words in Latin, it will allow them to read and understand 50% of most written Latin. Further, knowledge of 1,500 Latin words will put one at the 80% level of vocabulary mastery for most texts. Mastering even a very small list of vocabulary allows one to read a large variety of texts very comfortably. These numbers become even smaller when considering ancient Greek texts. [cross reference: http://boffosocko.com/2014/07/05/latin-pedagogy-and-the-digital-humanities/ and http://dcc.dickinson.edu/vocab/vocabulary-lists]

Another interesting measurement is the vocabulary of a modern 2 year old who typically has a 50-75 word vocabulary while a 4 year old has 250-500 words, which is about the level of the exercise.

As a contrast, consider the message in this TED Youth Talk from last year by Erin McKean, which students should be able to relate to: https://www.ted.com/talks/erin_mckean_go_ahead_make_up_new_words

 

The Mozart Myth about Creativity http://www.johndcook.com/blog/2015/04/20/the-mozart-myth/ Thoughts @rgreenbergmusic?