Skip to main content

Biomedical and Electrical Engineer with interests in information theory, evolution, genetics, abstract mathematics, microbiology, big history, Indieweb, and the entertainment industry including: finance, distribution, representation

boffosocko.com

chrisaldrich

chrisaldrich

+13107510548

chris@boffosocko.com

u/0/+ChrisAldrich1

stream.boffosocko.com

www.boffosockobooks.com

chrisaldrich

pnut.io/@chrisaldrich

mastodon.social/@chrisaldrich

micro.blog/c

 

@EddieHinkle @jackyalcine @wilkieii Almost as a joke on Facebook functionality a while back, I posted this voting related post: https://boffosocko.com/2016/11/08/i-voted/
There are some interesting suggestions and use cases here as well: http://microformats.org/wiki/vote-links

 

@rupl @jsruppel I love that my mom does much the same thing!
Of course I wrote a little about it and it put me at the top of HackerNews for most of a day... :)
http://boffosocko.com/2017/07/11/the-facebook-algorithm-mom-problem/

 

John, I like your much broader view of the syndication idea. I keep it in the back of my head, but too often just deal with the immediate idea with regard to silos. I'd love to have additional examples of the type you mentioned.

Separately, in Ben's original post, I don't think he explicitly mentioned it, but I suspect one of the motivating reasons behind his having written it was the fact that Facebook had just announced that on August 1st they're going to cut off the part of their API that allows outside services to syndicate content into Facebook. They recently just shut off the ability to RSVP to events remotely.

 

The magic is likely courtesy of the fact that my post has a meta tag for og:image that includes (or transcludes) that image from Naughton's website. It's something I added in for syndicating to sites like Twitter or Facebook to add a little visual interest. I suspect that whatever you're using to unfurl the page on your site is picking up that data to display it as context for your like. You'll notice that the same photo appears on Twitter as well: https://twitter.com/ChrisAldrich/status/985421744348381184

I'm currently doing this with fields in the All In One SEO plugin for WordPress, though I suspect that Yoast and other Open Graph meta related plugins will do it as well. More often than not I use the functionality to force particular photos to be shown in syndicated services. Usually I'll also transclude the photo in my own post, so in most cases you probably wouldn't have guessed. Sharp eye for having noticed here Jeremy.

 

Jeremy, if you haven't tried it before, take a look at Ryan Barrett's Instagram Atom Feeds tool https://instagram-atom.appspot.com/ which will give you the ability to put your Instagram account into a feed reader and allow you to have both an ad-free and chronological stream of your Instagram feed. The UI you get may be somewhat dependent on the reader (and its settings) you use to consume it, but it's better than the slightly prettier and draconian alternative.

As for extracting your own photo data, I've heard this week that although Instagram is cutting off more and more API access, while confronting the Facebook problem lately and the looming GDPR, they've apparently enabled the ability to download all of your photos. I haven't tried it yet to see what the data looks like or the quality of the images is, but it's a tiny step forward for data freedom that they didn't have before.

 

@fionajvoss It looks like I've been automatically syndicating many of my short reviews to multiple places like Twitter, Facebook, GoodReads et al. Less often I send them to Amazon, Yelp, IMDb, but I suspect more friends seem them that way anyway. http://boffosocko.com/category/review/

 

RSVP invited · Issue #156 · pfefferle/wordpress-semantic-linkbacks https://github.com/pfefferle/wordpress-semantic-linkbacks/issues/156

When Brid.gy sends webmentions for people invited via a Facebook POSSE copy, the webmentions for these people don't show up properly in comments because `semantic_linkbacks_type` is set to "invite" instead of "rsvp:invited".

Manually effecting the change in the database provides the expected display. See: http://boffosocko.com/2018/02/14/homebrew-website-club-meetup-on-february-21-2018/#Invited

 

Khürt, I can feel your pain. I know that SNAP just made a recent major release that changed a lot of it's code base, so I've been half purposely waiting to update while they work out some of the kinks. I'm just about to download the most recent and test it out on a server before I upgrade to the latest version on my production site, since the old version is still doing a relatively good job and it's a lot of overhead to update/upgrade going into the holidays.

There's a frequent phrase that many in the chat will use: by which they mean try doing everything manually to work on getting the output and workflow to work the way you want it to and only then try automating things based on your manual experience.

There are many ways of doing syndication, so before settling on one, try doing things by hand for a bit while you're testing out other potential options. I often find that even though I've got automated means of doing things very quickly, I actually often prefer the manual methods sometimes, particularly when it means I know exactly what the output will be. With POSSE you'll find that with some of the automated means, the easier it is to set up, the less options you'll have for control, while the more control you get means a much more difficult set up.

Try a few options and then go with what works for your needs until it drives you so crazy you have to change it. In the meanwhile, documenting the issues and problems either on your site or in issue queues will slowly help things get better.

In the end it can't be much worse than people who are syndicating their Facebook content to Twitter that simply shows up as just the raw https://fb.me/123456789 URLs and nothing else. ;)

 

Replied to a post on github.com :

Which sites are you syndicating to? I know it's the case that not all sites that SNAP supports are supported by Syndication Links. Most of the major ones like Facebook, Twitter, and Tumblr are, but some of the lesser ones like Flipboard, 500px aren't.

 

@khurtwilliams A bunch of us are working on making it all easier in steps, but we're also doing it on a volunteer basis. Some of the key is knowing what it all comprises from a top-down perspective, then knowing what each of the individual pieces are and how they work. Nearly every week there's something new and cool. The key is to figure out which things you find the most useful and valuable and work on those one at a time.

It's a LOT easier now that it was even 8 months ago and will be measurably easier as time goes by. I'm currently writing a book on how to do it all at the level of "IndieWeb with WordPress for Dummies". Ideally it'll be as easy to do as signing up for a Twitter or Facebook account and just going, but we're not quite there yet, but it's getting easier to do the set up without knowing a lot of (or any) code. Hoping into the chat, going to a Homebrew Website Club or IndieWebCamp can be immeasurably helpful as well.

Again, if you want to do a quick conference call/video chat, I'm happy to help you out.

 

@khurtwilliams POSSE for WordPress can be tricky in part because, compared to most other IndieWeb pieces for WordPress, there are multiple different and varying ways to do it. Using one method could potentially conflict with another depending on how you set things up, though I think these are relatively few.

Your best bet is to hop into the channel of the IndieWeb chat https://indieweb.org/discuss and ask for help, particularly to discuss the specifics of what you'd like to do and what you expect.

In general, the more control and flexibility you want over the display of your POSSE posts, the more set up and work you have to put into it (e.g. SNAP), while the less control you have the more simple the set up (e.g. JetPack Publicize).

Things like Brid.gy publish functionality (or via the Brid.gy Publish plugin) can be more finicky for POSSE copies to silos because Brid.gy is parsing your site for the proper data to publish. (It does have a preview button built in to do manual tests if you need to.) This means that if your WordPress theme doesn't have the correct microformats markup (and often they don't), then you can get spurious results, particularly when it comes to crossposting photos.

Most of the main POSSE plugins and tech are very stable in fact, but they do require that you do a bit of reading and understanding what they do and don't do and what you can and can't control with them. Most all of them have GitHub repositories that you can post issues to and almost all the devs, maintainers, and community are happy to help you out and/or make changes to make the UI and documentation better.

As for backfeed from Brid.gy, it generally requires that the URLs of your post and the syndicated post have matching permalinks to be able to match the two up to send you the webmentions properly. You may have changed your settings, but one piece you appear to be missing is the Syndication Links Plugin which allows you to add u-syndication links to your posts so that Brid.gy knows which ones to send your responses to. Much of this is documented at https://indieweb.org/WordPress_with_Bridgy It also looks like you don't have either an h-card or the appropriate rel-me links on your pages for Twitter, Facebook, et al. Brid.gy is pretty well documented, so you may want to take a look at some of the options there directly. https://brid.gy/about If it helps, you can do a lot of interactive stuff with Bridgy by manually creating posts with specific html in your posts directly. Understanding how to do this can be helpful later when you switch to using a plugin to help automate part of those processes.

I'm sure I've got a few odd posts from ages ago when I tested things out, but when you say "I can also see from some of the failed posts on your website that you may experience the same issues." I'm curious which particular posts you mean? To my knowledge things I intend to syndicate out are currently working as I expect them to (aside from one quirk that occasionally spams the Indieweb chat with micropubbed posts which continually redirect, but that's specific only to me because of some experimental code I've been running). It is the case that I don't always syndicate everything to each and every silo target I could. I do very much pick and choose which things to syndicate to particular networks.

We'll help you get there yet!

 

Facebook Silences Rohingya Reports of Ethnic Cleansing http://www.thedailybeast.com/exclusive-rohingya-activists-say-facebook-silences-them

 
 

@billbennettnz @davewiner I think I mentioned to you that @Chronotope was mulling something over along these lines:
https://twitter.com/Chronotope/status/830097158665801728

I'm curious if there's a middle ground? The way that @davewiner does his blog with updating hashes throughout the day would be interesting within news distribution, that way the URL changes, but at the same time it doesn't really. Example: http://scripting.com/2017/08/17.html#a094957 (Naturally the ability to update RSS feeds over time would be useful---as he describes in this particular post--, but it would also depend heavily on how users are subscribing to their news.) In his case, the updates are categorized by day/date rather than topic or category which is what an unfolding story would more likely do in a digital news publication.

In some sense, these hashes are related to the IndieWeb concept of fragmentions: https://indieweb.org/fragmention, though in their original use case, they're meant to highlight pieces within a whole. This doesn't mean they couldn't be bent sideways a little to serve a more news-specific piece that includes a river of updates as a story unfolds--especially since they're supported by most browsers. It would be much easier to syndicate the updates of the originals out to social media locations like Twitter or Facebook this way too. Readers on Twitter, for example, could see and be directed to the latest, but still have easy access to "the rest of the story" as Paul Harvey would say.

Depending on implementation, news sites could offer a tl;dr toggle button that gives a quick multi-graph synopsis. As I recall USA Today and Digiday used to do something like this on longer pieces:
https://twitter.com/ChrisAldrich/status/632063182811467776
Here's a version of the functionality via the WayBackMachine that still works: https://web.archive.org/web/20150818075138/http://digiday.com:80/publishers/mics-social-approach-distributing-first-obama-interview/

Imagine how powerful a long running story could be with all of these features? Or even snippets of inter-related stories which could be plugged into larger wholes? Eg: The Trump Administration's handling of North Korea seen in fact snippets over time spanning months while pieces of this could be integrated into a larger Trump Administration mega-story going back to January or even the beginning of his campaign. Someone who hasn't been following along could jump back months or years to catch up relatively quickly, but still have access to more context that is often missing from bigger pieces which need to stand on their own relatively.




 

@cdevroe @johnjohnston Ideally, it would be best if people were using their own blogs for direct replies. Then *if* they choose to syndicate those responses to micro.blog, it would be best if micro.blog were able to parse that reply and see the in-reply-to mf2 class to be able to properly find and thread the conversation on micro.blog.

I tend to treat micro.blog as a feed reader of sorts, but for those who have their own blogs with webmentions (the case with this post right here), I'll definitely reply to their blog directly, though this can tend to dampen the conversation for those taking part on micro.blog, but this is the case for the disjointed conversations happening on Facebook, Twitter, etc. Sometimes it's not always easy to keep the conversation on one's own site while simultaneously playing nicely with silos.

While micro.blog is a great product that supports some interesting pieces, for those with their own sites and webmentions, it's still just another silo. The secret is to treat it the same way one would with Twitter, Facebook, or any other site you'd syndicate out to. Because micro.blog is a hybrid site sitting between the old world and the new, how you use it and interact will have to change based on whether you're using it for hosting or not and whether you support niceties like Webmentions or not.

For me It's always been easier to post the start of the thread and then go to micro.blog (or Twitter or Facebook) to continue a discussion with others knowing that I'll get the webmentions back to my site where I'll still manage to own the content. The tougher piece is for others (who also own their sites) to inject their reply via their own site into the original person's blog as well as the siloed conversation at the same time.