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Biomedical and Electrical Engineer with interests in information theory, evolution, genetics, abstract mathematics, microbiology, big history, Indieweb, and the entertainment industry including: finance, distribution, representation

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chrisaldrich

chrisaldrich

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Growing list of educators & researchers who are using . Who am I missing? https://twitter.com/ChrisAldrich/lists/educators-in-indieweb/members

 
 

@natalieasis Just don't let them talk you into changing gears yourself...

 
 

Helping physicist John Baez transition: G+ -> @WordPress; see notes https://plus.google.com/u/0/117663015413546257905/posts/MYiSb1m4YtX

 
 

Lexicographers have identified it as a "thing": p-hacking http://wordspy.com/index.php?word=p-hacking

 
 

At the most basic level [book:Getting What You Came For: The Smart Student's Guide to Earning an M.A. or a Ph.D.|460669] has some relatively sound advice. If you need something entertaining my friend Adam Ruben's book [book:Surviving Your Stupid, Stupid Decision to Go to Grad School|7769479] is pretty good.

For some of the other topics you mention, start reading The Chronicle of Higher Education. Most of it is available online without a subscription, but they've got lots of current faculty writing regularly on the topics you mentioned.

Slowly you'll find a community of online professors like Robert Talbert (http://chronicle.com/blognetwork/castingoutnines/) or blogs like http://mathwithbaddrawings.com/ that can be very helpful. Then there's even folks like https://terrytao.wordpress.com/ as well.

On twitter, you might consider following some the people on this list to start: https://twitter.com/ChrisAldrich/lists/mathematicians/members
Within twitter, there are a handful of hashtags you might following/comment along with including: , , and likely a handful of others.

On the practical side, consider creating accounts on mendeley.com, academica.com, researchgate.com, etc. as a way to find people, help, material, etc. You might also consider starting yourself a blog (aka Commonplace book) to collect all your thoughts: http://stream.withknown.com/2015/why-you-should-start-a-website-as-a-college-student (Keep in mind that some platforms like WordPress allow you to keep things as "drafts" without publishing them, so they're then available everywhere you might need them.)

Finally, for graduate level math, I highly recommend spending the $100-200 for a Livescribe Pulse pen: http://www.livescribe.com.

Feel free to ping me here or via other means (http://boffosocko.com) for help/questions.