Skip to main content

Biomedical and Electrical Engineer with interests in information theory, evolution, genetics, abstract mathematics, microbiology, big history, Indieweb, and the entertainment industry including: finance, distribution, representation

boffosocko.com

chrisaldrich

chrisaldrich

+13107510548

chris@boffosocko.com

u/0/+ChrisAldrich1

stream.boffosocko.com

www.boffosockobooks.com

chrisaldrich

pnut.io/@chrisaldrich

mastodon.social/@chrisaldrich

micro.blog/c

 

Against the Rules: Referees, Journalism, and Politics

2 min read

If correct, the hypothesis by Michael Lewis in Against the Rules could have some profound implications into how we view politics and particularly the current President of the United States and why we need accurate, fair, and objective journalism. Trump's fame is making him cry foul more than is necessary, particularly amidst accusations of wrongdoing. In the episode Ref, You Suck! one can see a clear analogy between the NBA and the current political hellscape.

"...he [referring to Larry Byrd, but this could easily be applied to Donald J. Trump] played with certain assumptions about the rules and how they applied to him..."
"The NBA has set out to ref the game more objectively, more accurately, more fairly. This has enraged the stars and their coaches. You want to know why? The more objectivity there is, the less power they have. Objective refs eliminate some of their privilege. The stars can't get the calls anymore just because they're stars, or anyway, not as often. Lebron James and Kevin Durant and Stef Curry and Clay Thompson, they'll all survive better refs because they're actually just better than everyone else, they don't need unfairness to win. [...]
I think American life just now has at least one thing in common with basketball. The authority of its referees is under attack. And when you have a weak referee you have a big problem. Because a weak referee is a referee who can be bought or intimidated or just simply ignored. A situation goes from being more or less well referred to more or less not. Then one day you wake up in a world that seems not just unfair but actually sort of rigged. That is, it is incapable of becoming fair because the people who benefit from the unfairness have the power to preserve it. Boom!"

tagged:

 
 
 
 

@kristenhare A growing group of journalists are joining the IndieWeb movement to better own their work and data within their own personal archives as well as using tools like Ben's to archive their work on larger institutional repositories. There's a stub page on the group's wiki dedicated to ideas like this for journalists at https://indieweb.org/Indieweb_for_Journalism

Coincident with these particular sites disappearing, there's now also news today that Peter Thiel may purchase Gawker in a bid to make it disappear from the internet, which makes these tools all the more relevant to the thousands who wrote for that outlet over the past decade.

For journalists and technologists who are deeply committed to these ideas, I'd recommend visiting the Reynolds Journalism Institute. They just finished a two day conference entitled "Dodging the Memory Hole" at the Internet Archive last week focused on saving/archiving digital news in various forms. (https://www.rjionline.org/events/dodging-the-memory-hole-2017) Naturally most of the conference was streamed and is available on YouTube (as well as archived.) Keep your eyes peeled for next year's conference which typically occurs in November.

 

@jayrosen_nyu, @jeffjarvis and students may appreciate the live stream from Internet Archive: Dodging the Memory Hole 2017 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vIHM37FNpL8

Naturally the whole conference will be archived.

 

Makes me wish I was in Auckland at the end of the month to chat with @billbennettnz on @WordPress and
https://twitter.com/billbennettnz/status/929939875058429952

 

Okay journalists, let's change this shall we?
https://twitter.com/NiamhNic/status/919504056795697152?s=09

 

.@chronotope & @pressfwd may appreciate this conference
Dodging the Memory Hole 2017
https://www.rjionline.org/events/dodging-the-memory-hole-2017

 
 

@Chronotope Congratulations! Apparently X=Aram... Journalism is saved! ;)

 

A pretty solid explanation for why journalism sucks right now. This: https://twitter.com/girlziplocked/status/898578685174972418?s=09

 

@billbennettnz @davewiner I think I mentioned to you that @Chronotope was mulling something over along these lines:
https://twitter.com/Chronotope/status/830097158665801728

I'm curious if there's a middle ground? The way that @davewiner does his blog with updating hashes throughout the day would be interesting within news distribution, that way the URL changes, but at the same time it doesn't really. Example: http://scripting.com/2017/08/17.html#a094957 (Naturally the ability to update RSS feeds over time would be useful---as he describes in this particular post--, but it would also depend heavily on how users are subscribing to their news.) In his case, the updates are categorized by day/date rather than topic or category which is what an unfolding story would more likely do in a digital news publication.

In some sense, these hashes are related to the IndieWeb concept of fragmentions: https://indieweb.org/fragmention, though in their original use case, they're meant to highlight pieces within a whole. This doesn't mean they couldn't be bent sideways a little to serve a more news-specific piece that includes a river of updates as a story unfolds--especially since they're supported by most browsers. It would be much easier to syndicate the updates of the originals out to social media locations like Twitter or Facebook this way too. Readers on Twitter, for example, could see and be directed to the latest, but still have easy access to "the rest of the story" as Paul Harvey would say.

Depending on implementation, news sites could offer a tl;dr toggle button that gives a quick multi-graph synopsis. As I recall USA Today and Digiday used to do something like this on longer pieces:
https://twitter.com/ChrisAldrich/status/632063182811467776
Here's a version of the functionality via the WayBackMachine that still works: https://web.archive.org/web/20150818075138/http://digiday.com:80/publishers/mics-social-approach-distributing-first-obama-interview/

Imagine how powerful a long running story could be with all of these features? Or even snippets of inter-related stories which could be plugged into larger wholes? Eg: The Trump Administration's handling of North Korea seen in fact snippets over time spanning months while pieces of this could be integrated into a larger Trump Administration mega-story going back to January or even the beginning of his campaign. Someone who hasn't been following along could jump back months or years to catch up relatively quickly, but still have access to more context that is often missing from bigger pieces which need to stand on their own relatively.




 

Journalism about female scientists alternative to the Bechdel test

https://twitter.com/kkatot/status/891360022885789696

 

Excited to see @danehillard working on Webmention for Django!

https://github.com/easy-as-python/django-webmention